Welcome to Alamo Liaison Squadron

At ALS, we continue to do our part to ensure the U.S. of A. remains the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave. Our museum, comprising the only flying collection of WWII L-birds—liaison aircraft—along with artifacts of the era, serves the community and our nation in a multitude of ways.

Stinson L-5 Sentinel

Stinson L-5 Sentinel

The Stinson L-5 was the only purpose-built L-bird and the second most widely used liaison aircraft in WWII. It was rugged and powerful. The L-5 was called the Flying Jeep as it could perform many of the same duties.

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Aeronca L-3 Defender

Aeronca L-3 Defender

The Aeronca L-3 joined similar Grasshopper-types in spotting, directing artillery fire, transport, short-range reconnaissance, and training. Some served in North Africa for the Free French Forces.

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Taylorcraft L-2 Grasshopper

Taylorcraft L-2 Grasshopper

The Taylorcraft L-2 was an observation and reconnaissance aircraft built for U.S. Army Ground and Air Forces in WWII. L-2s were powered by a 65-horsepower engines and served stateside for training operations.

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This is History on the Wing – Video

Bob Salter was a storyteller, cyclist and professional air medical helicopter pilot. In 2014, he paid a visit to Cannon Field. A longtime member of ALS, Bob was also an accomplished fixed-wing pilot and certified flight instructor. He was known throughout San Antonio and the south Texas region for his many years as TV anchorman.

The Grasshoppers – Naval History Ships

Excerpted from Naval History magazine, Historic Aircraft – The Grasshoppers, Part 2: The Ships, by Norman Polmar, March 2014 Army and Marine “grasshoppers” (light-observation/liaison aircraft) flew in almost every combat theater during World War II—sometimes from ships. The grasshoppers were needed to spot artillery fire as soon as possible after troops came ashore. When U.S.

The Grasshoppers – Naval History Planes

Excerpted from Naval History magazine, Historic Aircraft – The Grasshoppers, Part 1: The Planes, by Norman Polmar, January 2014 The U.S. armed forces procured several thousand light observation/liaison aircraft beginning at the start of World War II. Known colloquially as “grasshoppers,” a few hundred were flown by the Navy and (mostly) the Marine Corps. These

Liaison Corps

Excerpted from Best Little Stories from World War II: More than 100 true stories (2nd edition), by C. Brian Kelly, pp. 196-198. War Still Supreme For Spencer R. Quick of Chicago, it wasn’t always the Japanese he had to worry about while flying tiny single-engine liaison airplanes in China. The other kind of risk could

Parade fly over by ALS

The Devine News, Thursday, November 17, 2005, Page 11 Four WWII vintage planes from the Alamo Liaison Group, honored parade attendees with a three pass flyover during the Fall Festival Parade Saturday, November 5th. Below is their story.

Casablanca: Operation Torch

Disaster off Casablanca: Air Observation Posts in Operation Torch and the Role of Failure in Institutional Innovation Includes excerpts from the article in Air Power History, Fall 2002, by Edgar Frank Raines, Jr. Both failure and success sometimes lie in the coordinated and spontaneous actions of individuals and the totality of their organization. This is

World War II lives on in South Texas Skies

San Antonio Express-News, Sunday, April 4, 1993, by Susan Yerkes. To some, history is what you find in a high-school textbook. To others, it is fading memories. But to Bob Hood, P.D. Straw, Baylor Randle, Bill Houston, Earl Collins and the other men of the Alamo Liaison Squadron, history is a living, soaring, winged thing