Welcome to Alamo Liaison Squadron

At ALS, we continue to do our part to ensure the U.S. of A. remains the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave. Our museum, comprising the only flying collection of WWII L-birds—liaison aircraft—along with artifacts of the era, serves the community and our nation in a multitude of ways.

Stinson L-5 Sentinel

Stinson L-5 Sentinel

The Stinson L-5 was the only purpose-built L-bird and the second most widely used liaison aircraft in WWII. It was rugged and powerful. The L-5 was called the Flying Jeep as it could perform many of the same duties.

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Aeronca L-3 Defender

Aeronca L-3 Defender

The Aeronca L-3 joined similar Grasshopper-types in spotting, directing artillery fire, transport, short-range reconnaissance, and training. Some served in North Africa for the Free French Forces.

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Taylorcraft L-2 Grasshopper

Taylorcraft L-2 Grasshopper

The Taylorcraft L-2 was an observation and reconnaissance aircraft built for U.S. Army Ground and Air Forces in WWII. L-2s were powered by a 65-horsepower engines and served stateside for training operations.

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Lightplanes Are Warplanes

Reprinted from Infantry Journal, by Private John Wolbarst, July 1941. Six thousand airplanes of less than 100 horsepower produced in 1940 attest recognition of the great sport to be found in a lightplane. That the same lightplane is potentially a military instrument of real value is less well recognized. There have been proposals for the

Wings For Santa Barbara

Excerpted from The Field Artillery Journal, April 1941, by Major William W. Ford, Field Artillery. It is perhaps unfortunate that most of our field artillery officers have learned their gunnery at Fort Sill! Before the author of that statement is shot as a heretic, he wishes to explain. He doesn’t mean the School, he means

Sporting Wings

A 1940s Film on Civil Aviation in the U.S. Sport flying and “pleasure planeing… along the limitless highways of the skies. Compact little monoplanes, ranging in price from $1,200–2,000.” 6-Ship Formation Takeoff Flying a plane like this is not a rich man’s sport. Flying club members cut upkeep costs by doing most of their own

Some New “Dope” on the Ryan YO-51

Reprinted from Air Corps News Letter, March 15, 1940. “Emulation of our seniors,” says the News Letter Correspondent at the Ryan School of Aeronautics, San Diego, Calif., “had always seemed a pretty good adage that has paid certain appreciable dividends in our flying progress at Ryan School. “We are now facing a very critical situation,

Blind Firing

Excerpted from The Field Artillery Journal, May–June 1939, Michael V. Gannon, Captain, Field Artillery, Editor Over the past few years our consciousness has been thoroughly awakened to the import of “blind flying,” but during the same period little or nothing has been said or done about “blind firing” in Field Artillery. Parenthetically, it should be

Air Observation in the Field Artillery

Quandary Memorandum for the Deputy Chief of Staff [Maj. Gen. Hugh Drum], June 18, 1938, by General Malin Craig, Army Chief of Staff There is no doubt about the value of controlling fire of field artillery from the air. This requires rapid and accurate transmission of information from the Artillery Observer to the firing unit