The Army Aviation Story – PART VII

Excerpted from US Army Aviation Digest, December 1962, The Army Aviation Story by Richard Tierney, Part VII, The War Years, Europe—Pacific—Korea After Italy fell, World War II raged on in Europe and the Pacific. As Allied might grew, so did the Army’s confidence in its liaison pilots. REPORT FROM EUROPE During the invasion of France in

The Army Aviation Story – Part VI

Excerpted from US Army Aviation Digest, November 1962, The Army Aviation Story by Richard Tierney, The War Years, Part VI—North Africa, Sicily, Italy I believe that the Army of today has a much keener appreciation for the value of observation aircraft than did most of our commanders in World War II. I used light planes frequently

The Army Aviation Story – Part III

Excerpted from US Army Aviation Digest, August 1962, The Army Aviation Story by M/Sgt Thomas M. Lang, Part III—Fixed Wing Aircraft THE QUALITY and capabilities of aircraft in the current Army inventory represent a distinct improvement over the hardware that was available the now-historic 6th of June 1942. Considerable progress has been made in both the

The Army Aviation Story – Part II

Excerpted from US Army Aviation Digest, July 1962, The Army Aviation Story by Richard Tierney, Part II—Academics and Training MAJ WILLIAM W. FORD headed a list of light aviation enthusiasts who throughout 1941 had worked diligently to bring about the birth of Army Aviation. In late 1942 he was named by Gen Robert M. Danford,

20th Anniversary of Army Aviation – Part I

Excerpted from US Army Aviation Digest, June 1962, The Army Aviation Story by Richard Tierney, Part I TWENTY YEARS ago this month America was mobilizing for an all-out war effort against the Axis. At Fort Sill, Okla., the Artillery School was a scene of intense activity. But, in odd contrast to the surrounding hustle and

The Army Aviation Story

Excerpts from US Army Aviation Digest, June 1961, The Army Aviation Story by Captain William K. Key Many contend Army Aviation was born June 6, 1942, when organic aircraft were first authorized in the Field Artillery for air observation. [It was in 1941] that Army ground commanders seriously began looking to their pressing aviation needs. That

Men and Planes

Excerpted from The Army Air Forces in World War II by Wesley Frank Craven and James Lea Cate. Chapter 6 – AAF Aircraft of World War II The more highly publicized planes, such as the B-17 and the P-47, became familiar to the American public according to a conventional mode of designation that combined a

L-5 Medical Support, Army Air Forces

Excerpts from Medical Support of the Army Air Forces in World War II by Mae Mills Link and Hubert A. Coleman. Office of the Surgeon General, USAF, Washington, D.C., 1955. Air Evacuation Mission – AAF School of Air Evacuation At Randolph Field, November 1944, two C-47 aircraft, one L-5B, and one C-54 type aircraft were

GHQ Maneuvers of 1941

Excerpts from: The U.S. Army GHQ Maneuvers of 1941, by Christopher R. Gabel …there would be more real equipment and less simulation in the 1941 maneuvers than had been the case in previous years. General McNair was reported as saying that he wanted no more maneuvers in which “one man with a flag is a

Lessons from the Liaisons

The Grasshoppers’ wartime operations record can point the way toward safer lightplane flying in the future. Reprinted from Flying magazine, January 1947, by Wilfred Owen. When lightplanes joined the Army shortly before Pearl Harbor they didn’t look very much like war­riors. But they soon proved that you don’t have to be big and tough to